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Welcome to Technology Short Take #41, the latest in my series of random thoughts, articles, and links from around the Internet. Here’s hoping you find something useful!

Networking

  • Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) is a networking topic that is starting to get more and more attention (some may equate “attention” with “hype”; I’ll allow you to draw your own conclusion there). In any case, I liked how this article really hit upon what I personally feel is something many people are overlooking in NFV. Many vendors are simply rushing to provide virtualized versions of their solution without addressing the orchestration and automation side of the house. I’m looking forward to part 2 on this topic, in which the author plans to share more technical details.
  • Rob Sherwood, CTO of Big Switch, recently published a reasonably in-depth look at “modern OpenFlow” implementations and how they can leverage multiple tables in hardware. Some good information in here, especially on OpenFlow basics (good for those of you who aren’t familiar with OpenFlow).
  • Connecting Docker containers to Open vSwitch is one thing, but what about using Docker containers to run Open vSwitch in userspace? Read this.
  • Ivan knocks centralized SDN control planes in this post. It sounds like Ivan favors scale-out architectures, not scale-up architectures (which are typically what is seen in centralized control plane deployments).
  • Looking for more VMware NSX content? Anthony Burke has started a new series focusing on VMware NSX in pure vSphere environments. As far as I can tell, Anthony is up to 4 posts in the series so far. Check them out here: part 1, part 2, part 3, and part 4. Enjoy!

Servers/Hardware

  • Good friend Simon Seagrave is back to the online world again with this heads-up on a potential NIC issue with an HP Proliant firmware update. The post also contains a link to a fix for the issue. Glad to see you back again, Simon!
  • Tom Howarth asks, “Is the x86 blade server dead?” (OK, so he didn’t use those words specifically. I’m paraphrasing for dramatic effect.) The basic premise of Tom’s position is that new technologies like server-side caching and VSAN/Ceph/Sanbolic (turning direct-attached storage into shared storage) will dramatically change the landscape of the data center. I would generally agree, although I’m not sure that I agree with Tom’s statement that “complexity is reduced” with these technologies. I think we’re just shifting the complexity to a different place, although it’s a place where I think we can better manage the complexity (and perhaps mask it). What do you think?

Security

Cloud Computing/Cloud Management

  • Juan Manuel Rey has launched a series of blog posts on deploying OpenStack with KVM and VMware NSX. He has three parts published so far; all good stuff. See part 1, part 2, and part 3.
  • Kyle Mestery brought to my attention (via Twitter) this list of the “best newly-available OpenStack guides and how-to’s”. It was good to see a couple of Cody Bunch’s articles on the list; Cody’s been producing some really useful OpenStack content recently.
  • I haven’t had the opportunity to use SaltStack yet, but I’m hearing good things about it. It’s always helpful (to me, at least) to be able to look at products in the context of solving a real-world problem, which is why seeing this post with details on using SaltStack to automate OpenStack deployment was helpful.
  • Here’s a heads-up on a potential issue with the vCAC 6.0.1.1 upgrade—the upgrade apparently changes some configuration files. The linked blog post provides more details on which files get changed. If you’re looking at doing this upgrade, read this to make sure you aren’t adversely affected.
  • Here’s a post with some additional information on OpenStack live migration that you might find useful.

Operating Systems/Applications

  • RHEL7, Docker, and Puppet together? Here’s a post on just such a use case (oh, I forgot to mention OpenStack’s involved, too).
  • Have you ever walked through a spider web because you didn’t see it ahead of time? (Not very fun.) Sometimes I feel that way with certain technologies or projects—like there are connections there with other technologies, projects, trends, etc., that aren’t quite “visible” just yet. That’s where I am right now with the recent hype around containers and how they are going to replace VMs. I’m not so sure I agree with that just yet…but I have more noodling to do on the topic.

Storage

  • “Server SAN” seems to be the name that is emerging to describe various technologies and architectures that create pools of storage from direct-attached storage (DAS). This would include products like VMware VSAN as well as projects like Ceph and others. Stu Miniman has a nice write-up on Server SAN over at Wikibon; if you’re not familiar with some of the architectures involved, that might be a good place to start. Also at Wikibon, David Floyer has a write-up on the rise of Server SAN that goes into a bit more detail on business and technology drivers, friction to adoption, and some recommendations.
  • Red Hat recently announced they were acquiring Inktank, the company behind the open source scale-out Ceph project. Jon Benedict, aka “Captain KVM,” weighs in with his thoughts on the matter. Of course, there’s no shortage of thoughts on the acquisition—a quick web search will prove that—but I find it interesting that none of the “big names” in storage social media had anything to say (not that I could find, anyway). Howard? Stephen? Chris? Martin? Bueller?

Virtualization

  • Doug Youd pulled together a nice summary of some of the issues and facts around routed vMotion (vMotion across layer 3 boundaries, such as across a Clos fabric/leaf-spine topology). It’s definitely worth a read (and not just because I get mentioned in the article, either—although that doesn’t hurt).
  • I’ve talked before—although it’s been a while—about Hyper-V’s choice to rely on host-level NIC teaming in order to provide network link redundancy to virtual machines. Ben Armstrong talks about another option, guest-level NIC teaming, in this post. I’m not so sure that using guest-level teaming is any better than relying on host-level NIC teaming; what’s really needed is a more full-featured virtual networking layer.
  • Want to run nested ESXi on vCHS? Well, it’s not supported…but William Lam shows you how anyway. Gotta love it!
  • Brian Graf shows you how to remove IP pools using PowerCLI.

Well, that’s it for this time around. As always, I welcome all courteous comments, so feel free to share your thoughts, ideas, rants, links, or feedback in the comments below.

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Reader Brian Markussen—with whom I had the pleasure to speak at the Danish VMUG in Copenhagen earlier this month—brought to my attention an issue between VMware vSphere’s health check feature and Cisco UCS when using Cisco’s VIC cards. His findings, confirmed by VMware support and documented in this KB article, show that the health check feature doesn’t work properly with Cisco UCS and the VIC cards.

Here’s a quote from the KB article:

The distributed switch network health check, including the VLAN, MTU, and teaming policy check can not function properly when there are hardware virtual NICs on the server platform. Examples of this include but are not limited to Broadcom Flex10 systems and Cisco UCS systems.

(Ignore the fact that “UCS systems” is redundant.)

According to Brian, a fix for this issue will be available in a future update to vSphere. In the meantime, there doesn’t appear to be any workaround, so plan accordingly.

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Welcome to Technology Short Take #40. The content is a bit light this time around; I thought I’d give you, my readers, a little break. Hopefully there’s still some useful and interesting stuff here. Enjoy!

Networking

  • Bob McCouch has a nice write-up on options for VPNs to AWS. If you’re needing to build out such a solution, you might want to read his post for some additional perspectives.
  • Matthew Brender touches on a networking issue present in VMware ESXi with regard to VMkernel multi-homing. This is something others have touched on before (including myself, back in 2008—not 2006 as I tweeted one day), but Matt’s write-up is concise and to the point. You’ll definitely want to keep this consideration in mind for your designs. Another thing to consider: vSphere 5.5 introduces the idea of multiple TCP/IP stacks, each with its own routing table. As the ability to use multiple TCP/IP stacks extends throughout vSphere, it’s entirely possible this limitation will go away entirely.
  • YAOFC (Yet Another OpenFlow Controller), interesting only because it focuses on issues of scale (tens of thousands of switches with hundreds of thousands of endpoints). See here for details.

Servers/Hardware

  • Intel recently announced a refresh of the E5 CPU line; Kevin Houston has more details here.

Security

  • This one slipped past me in the last Technology Short Take, so I wanted to be sure to include it here. Mike Foley—whom I’m sure many of you know—recently published an ESXi security whitepaper. His blog post provides more details, as well as a link to download the whitepaper.
  • The OpenSSL “Heartbleed” vulnerability has captured a great deal of attention (justifiably so). Here’s a quick article on how to assess if your Linux-based server is affected.

Cloud Computing/Cloud Management

  • I recently built a Windows Server 2008 R2 image for use in my OpenStack home lab. This isn’t as straightforward as building a Linux image (no surprises there), but I did find a few good articles that helped along the way. If you find yourself needing to build a Windows image for OpenStack, check out creating a Windows image on OpenStack (via Gridcentric) and building a Windows image for OpenStack (via Brent Salisbury). You might also check out Cloudbase.it, which offers a version of cloud-init for Windows as well as some prebuilt evaluation images. (Note: I was unable to get the prebuilt images to download, but YMMV.)
  • Speaking of building OpenStack images, here’s a “how to” guide on building a Debian 7 cloud image for OpenStack.
  • Sean Roberts recently launched a series of blog posts about various OpenStack projects that he feels are important. The first project he highlights is Congress, a policy management project that has recently gotten a fair bit of attention (see a reference to Congress at the end of this recent article on the mixed messages from Cisco on OpFlex). In my opinion, Congress is a big deal, and I’m really looking forward to seeing how it evolves.
  • I have a related item below under Virtualization, but I wanted to point this out here: work is being done on a VIF driver to connect Docker containers to Open vSwitch (and thus to OpenStack Neutron). Very cool. See here for details.
  • I love that Cody Bunch thinks a lot like I do, like this quote from a recent post sharing some links on OpenStack Heat: “That generally means I’ve got way too many browser tabs open at the moment and need to shut some down. Thus, here comes a huge list of OpenStack links and resources.” Classic! Anyway, check out the list of Heat resources, you’re bound to find something useful there.

Operating Systems/Applications

  • A short while back I had a Twitter conversation about spinning up a Minecraft server for my kids in my OpenStack home lab. That led to a few other discussions, one of which was how cool it would be if you could use Heat autoscaling to scale Minecraft. Then someone sends me this.
  • Per the Microsoft Windows Server Team’s blog post, the Windows Server 2012 R2 Udpate is now generally available (there’s also a corresponding update for Windows 8.1).

Storage

  • Did you see that EMC released a virtual edition of VPLEX? It’s being called the “data plane” for software-defined storage. VPLEX is an interesting product, no doubt, and the introduction of a virtual edition is intriguing (but not entirely unexpected). I did find it unusual that the release of the virtual edition signalled the addition of a new feature called “MetroPoint”, which allows two sites to replicate back to a single site. See Chad Sakac’s blog post for more details.
  • This discussion on MPIO and in-guest iSCSI is a great reminder that designing solutions in a virtualized data center (or, dare I say it—a software-defined data center?) isn’t the same as designing solutions in a non-virtualized environment.

Virtualization

  • Ben Armstrong talks briefly about Hyper-V protected networks, which is a way to protect a VM against network outage by migrating the VM to a different host if a link failure occurs. This is kind of handy, but requires Windows Server clustering in order to function (since live migration in Hyper-V requires Windows Server clustering). A question for readers: is Windows Server clustering still much the same as it was in years past? It was a great solution in years past, but now it seems outdated.
  • At the same time, though, Microsoft is making some useful networking features easily accessible in Hyper-V. Two more of Ben’s articles show off the DHCP Guard and Router Guard features available in Hyper-V on Windows Server 2012.
  • There have been a pretty fair number of posts talking about nested ESXi (ESXi running as a VM on another hypervisor), either on top of ESXi or on top of VMware Fusion/VMware Workstation. What I hadn’t seen—until now—was how to get that working with OpenStack. Here’s how Mathias Ewald made it work.
  • And while we’re talking nested hypervisors, be sure to check out William Lam’s post on running a nested Xen hypervisor with VMware Tools on ESXi.
  • Check out this potential way to connect Docker containers with Open vSwitch (which then in turn opens up all kinds of other possibilities).
  • Jason Boche regales us with a tale of a vCenter 5.5 Update 1 upgrade that results in missing storage providers. Along the way, he also shares some useful information about Profile-Driven Storage in general.
  • Eric Gray shares information on how to prepare an ESXi ISO for PXE booting.
  • PowerCLI 5.5 R2 has some nice new features. Skip over to Alan Renouf’s blog to read up on what is included in this latest release.

I should close things out now, but I do have one final link to share. I really enjoyed Nick Marshall’s recent post about the power of a tweet. In the post, Nick shares how three tweets—one with Duncan Epping, one with Cody Bunch, and one with me—have dramatically altered his life and his career. It’s pretty cool, if you think about it.

Anyway, enough is enough. I hope that you found something useful here. I encourage readers to contribute to the discussion in the comments below. All courteous comments are welcome.

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Welcome to Technology Short Take #35, another in my irregular series of posts that collect various articles, links and thoughts regarding data center technologies. I hope that something in here is useful to you.

Networking

  • Art Fewell takes a deeper look at the increasingly important role of the virtual switch.
  • A discussion of “statefulness” brought me again to Ivan’s post on the spectrum of firewall statefulness. It’s so easy sometimes just to revert to “it’s stateful” or “it’s not stateful,” but the reality is that it’s not quite so black-and-white.
  • Speaking of state, I like this piece by Ivan as well.
  • I tend not to link to TechTarget posts any more than I have to, because invariably the articles end up going behind a login requirement just to read them. Even so, this Q&A session with Martin Casado on managing physical and virtual worlds in parallel might be worth going through the hassle.
  • This looks interesting.
  • VMware introduced VMware NSX recently at VMworld 2013. Cisco shared some thoughts on what they termed a “software-only” approach; naturally, they have a different vision for data center networking (and that’s OK). I was a bit surprised by some of the responses to Cisco’s piece (see here and here). In the end, though, I like Greg Ferro’s statement: “It is perfectly reasonable that both companies will ‘win’.” There’s room for a myriad of views on how to solve today’s networking challenges, and each approach has its advantages and disadvantages.

Servers/Hardware

Nothing this time around, but I’ll watch for items to include in future editions. Feel free to send me links you think would be useful to include in the future!

Security

  • I found this write-up on using OVS port mirroring with Security Onion for intrusion detection and network security monitoring.

Cloud Computing/Cloud Management

Operating Systems/Applications

  • In past presentations I’ve referenced the terms “snowflake servers” and “phoenix servers,” which I borrowed from Martin Fowler. (I don’t know if Martin coined the terms or not, but you can get more information here and here.) Recently among some of Martin’s material I saw reference to yet another term: the immutable server. It’s an interesting construct: rather than managing the configuration of servers, you simply spin up new instances when you need a new configuration; existing configurations are never changed. More information on the use of the immutable server construct is also available here. I’d be interested to hear readers’ thoughts on this idea.

Storage

  • Chris Evans takes a took at ScaleIO, recently acquired by EMC, and speculates on where ScaleIO fits into the EMC family of products relative to the evolution of storage in the data center.
  • While I was at VMworld 2013, I had the opportunity to talk with SanDisk’s FlashSoft division about their flash caching product. It was quite an interesting discussion, so stay tuned for that update (it’s almost written; expect it in the next couple of days).

Virtualization

  • The rise of new converged (or, as some vendors like to call it, “hyperconverged”) architectures means that we have to consider the impact of these new architectures when designing vSphere environments that will leverage them. I found a few articles by fellow VCDX Josh Odgers that discuss the impact of Nutanix’s converged architecture on vSphere designs. If you’re considering the use of Nutanix, have a look at some of these articles (see here, here, and here).
  • Jonathan Medd shows how to clone a VM from a snapshot using PowerCLI. Also be sure to check out this post on the vSphere CloneVM API, which Jonathan references in his own article.
  • Andre Leibovici shares an unofficial way to disable the use of the SESparse disk format and revert to VMFS Sparse.
  • Forgot the root password to your ESXi 5.x host? Here’s a procedure for resetting the root password for ESXi 5.x that involves booting on a Linux CD. As is pointed out in the comments, it might actually be easier to rebuild the host.
  • vSphere 5.5 was all the rage at VMworld 2013, and there was a lot of coverage. One thing that I didn’t see much discussion around was what’s going on with the free version of ESXi. Vladan Seget gives a nice update on how free ESXi is changing with version 5.5.
  • I am loving the micro-infrastructure series by my VMware vSphere Design co-author, Forbes Guthrie. See it here, here, and here.

It’s time to wrap up now; I’ve already included more links than I normally include (although it doesn’t seem like it). In any case, I hope that something I’ve shared here is helpful, and feel free to share your own thoughts, ideas, and feedback in the comments below. Have a great day!

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Well, the title kind of says it all—yes, there will be an update to the popular Mastering VMware vSphere 5 book, with new content for the vSphere 5.5 release announced today at VMworld. Availability of the new title is expected in late October or early November, but I believe it’s already available for pre-order on Amazon.

However, this book represents more than just another title in the Mastering VMware vSphere series. It represents a “changing of the guard,” so to speak. In order to understand why, allow me to share with you the story of how my very first book, Mastering VMware vSphere 4, came to be. This is a story that very few people know.

I suppose the story starts in 2008. As a blogger, I’d gained some visibility as a result of my liveblogging at VMworld 2007, and in 2008 I met Chad Sakac. Chad is now a hugely popular figure within the VMware community, but at the time he was “just” the leader of a little-known group within EMC. (This is the group that would later become known as the vSpecialists.) Chad and I chatted, geeked out on some VMware stuff, and became buddies. I didn’t really think too much about the connection; we were just a couple of virtualization geeks making a connection.

Then came early 2009. Chad contacted me, and said he’d been approached about writing a book. Unfortunately, he was unable to write the book; would I be interested in writing it, he asked. Heck yeah! Writing a book had been an item on my bucket list for a really long time. So Chad made the connections to Wiley/Sybex, contracts were signed, and at VMworld 2009 Mastering VMware vSphere 4 was released, quickly becoming a massive hit. I joined Chad’s vSpecialist team in 2010, and remained there for 3 years before transitioning to VMware earlier this year to focus on network virtualization.

Looking back on this series of events, it’s easy to see that this was a huge opportunity I’d received. So, when it came time to discuss writing the book that would become Mastering VMware vSphere 5.5, I asked myself: “I was just given this opportunity. Can I do the same for someone else? Can I pay this forward?” It was at that point I decided that I would not be the lead author for the next revision; instead, I would pass the torch on to someone else—someeone else who had “Write a book” on their bucket list. I wanted to give someone else the same opportunity I’d been given.

This is why Mastering VMware vSphere 5.5 represents a changing of the guard. This book embodies my decision to pay it forward, to give another worthy individual—in this case, Nick Marshall—the opportunity to do something he really wanted to do. Many of you know Nick; he’s been involved in the VMware community in a number of ways, through support of the vBrownbag Podcast as well as through his work with Alastair Cooke on AutoLab. In addition to that, he’s just a really nice guy, and that counts for something, too. I’m really thrilled that Nick has taken the lead with this book, and I’m really looking forward to seeing where he takes the Mastering VMware vSphere series.

So, if you’re looking for an authoritative reference to the vSphere 5.5 release, I would encourage you to pick up Mastering VMware vSphere 5.5. Nick and I, along with our co-conspirators Forbes Guthrie, Josh Atwell, and Matt Liebowitz, have done our best to produce something that is useful and informative. I hope that you agree.

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Welcome to Technology Short Take #34, my latest collection of links, articles, thoughts, and ideas from around the web, centered on key data center technologies. Enjoy!

Networking

  • Henry Louwers has a nice write-up on some of the design considerations that go into selecting a Citrix NetScaler solution.
  • Scott Hogg explores jumbo frames and their benefits/drawbacks in a clear and concise manner. It’s worth reading if you aren’t familiar with jumbo frames and some of the considerations around their use.
  • The networking “old guard” likes to talk about how x86 servers and virtualization create network bottlenecks due to performance concerns, but as Ivan points out in this post, it’s rapidly becoming—or has already become—a non-issue. (By the way, if you’re not already reading all of Ivan’s content, you need to be. Seriously.)
  • Greg Ferro, aka EtherealMind, has a great series of articles on overlay networking (a component technology used in a number of network virtualization solutions). Greg starts out with a quick look at the value prop for overlay networking. In addition to highlighting one key value of overlay networking—that decoupling the logical network from the physical network enables more rapid change and innovation—Greg also establishes that overlay networking is not new. Greg continues with a more detailed look at how overlay networking works. Finally, Greg takes a look at whether overlay networking and the physical network should be integrated; he arrives at the conclusion that integrating the two is likely to be unsuccessful given the history of such attempts in the past.
  • Terry Slattery ruminates on the power of creating (and using) the right abstraction in networking. The value of the “right abstraction” has come up a number of times; it was a featured discussion point of Martin Casado’s talk at the OpenStack Summit in Portland in April, and takes center stage in a recent post over at Network Heresy.
  • Here’s a decent two-part series about running Vyatta on VMware Workstation (part 1 and part 2).
  • Could we use OpenFlow to build better internet exchanges? Here’s one idea.

Servers/Hardware

Security

I have nothing to share this time around, but I’ll keep watch for content to include in future Technology Short Takes.

Cloud Computing/Cloud Management

  • Tom Fojta takes a look at integrating vCloud Automation Center (vCAC) with vCloud Director in this post. (By the way, congrats to Tom on becoming the first VCDX-Cloud!)
  • In case you missed it, here’s the recording for the #vBrownBag session with Jon Harris on vCAC. (I had the opportunity to hear Jon speak about his employer’s vCAC deployment and some of the lessons learned at a recent New Mexico VMUG meeting.)

Operating Systems/Applications

Storage

  • Rawlinson Rivera starts to address a lack of available information about Virsto in the first of a series of posts on VMware Virsto. This initial post provides an introduction to Virsto; future posts will provide more in-depth technical details (which is what I’m really looking forward to getting).
  • Nigel Poulton talks a bit about target driven zoning, something I’ve mentioned before on this site. For more information on target driven zoning (also referred to as peer zoning), also be sure to check out Erik Smith’s blog.
  • Now that he’s had some time to come up to speed in his new role, Frank Denneman has started a great series on the basic elements of PernixData’s Flash Virtualization Platform (FVP). You can read part 1 here and part 2 here. I’m looking forward to future parts in this series.
  • I’d often wondered this myself, and now Cormac Hogan has the answer: why is uploading files to VMFS so slow? Good information.

Virtualization

It’s time to wrap up now, or this Technology Short Take is going to turn into a Technology Long Take. Anyway, I hope you found something useful in this little collection. If you have any feedback or suggestions for improvement for future posts, feel free to speak up in the comments below.

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Welcome to Technology Short Take #33, the latest in my irregularly-published series of articles discussing various data center technology-related links, articles, rants, thoughts, and questions. I hope that you find something useful here. Enjoy!

Networking

  • Tom Nolle asks the question, “Is virtualization reality even more elusive than virtual reality?” It’s a good read; the key thing that I took away from it was that SDN, NFV, and related efforts are great, but what we really need is something that can pull all these together in a way that customers (and providers) reap the benefits.
  • What happens when multiple VXLAN logical networks are mapped to the same multicast group? Venky explains it in this post. Venky also has a great write-up on how the VTEP (VXLAN Tunnel End Point) learns and creates the forwarding table.
  • This post by Ranga Maddipudi shows you how to use App Firewall in conjunction with VXLAN logical networks.
  • Jason Edelman is on a roll with a couple of great blog posts. First up, Jason goes off on a rant about network virtualization, briefly hitting topics like the relationship between overlays and hardware, the role of hardware in network virtualization, the changing roles of data center professionals, and whether overlays are the next logical step in the evolution of the network. I particularly enjoyed the snippet from the post by Bill Koss. Next, Jason dives a bit deeper on the relationship between network overlays and hardware, and shares his thoughts on where it does—and doesn’t—make sense to have hardware terminating overlay tunnels.
  • Another post by Tom Nolle explores the relationship—complicated at times—between SDN, NFV, and the cloud. Given that we define the cloud (sorry to steal your phrase, Joe) as elastic, pooled resources with self-service functionality and ubiquitous access, I can see where Tom states that to discuss SDN or NFV without discussing cloud is silly. On the flip side, though, I have to believe that it’s possible for organizations to make a gradual shift in their computing architectures and processes, so one almost has to discuss these various components individually, because to tie them all together makes it almost impossible. Thoughts?
  • If you haven’t already introduced yourself to VXLAN (one of several draft protocols used as an overlay protocol), Cisco Inferno has a reasonable write-up.
  • I know Steve Jin, and he’s a really smart guy. I must disagree with some of his statements regarding what software-defined networking is and is not and where it fits, written back in April. I talked before about the difference between network virtualization and SDN, so no need to mention that again. Also, the two key flaws that Steve identifies—single point of failure and scalability—aren’t flaws with SDN/network virtualization, but rather flaws in an implementation of said technologies, IMHO.

Servers/Hardware

  • Correction from the last Technology Short Take—I incorrectly stated that the HP Moonshot offerings were ARM-based, and therefore wouldn’t support vSphere. I was wrong. The servers (right now, at least) are running Intel Atom S1260 CPUs, which are x86-based and do offer features like Intel VT-x. Thanks to all who pointed this out, and my apologies for the error!
  • I missed this on the #vBrownBag series: designing HP Virtual Connect for vSphere 5.x.

Security

Cloud Computing/Cloud Management

  • Hyper-V as hypervisor with OpenStack Compute? Sure, see here.
  • Cody Bunch, who has been focusing quite a bit on OpenStack recently, has a nice write-up on using Razor and Chef to automate an OpenStack build. Part 1 is here; part 2 is here. Good stuff—keep it up, Cody!
  • I’ve mentioned in some of my OpenStack presentations (see SpeakerDeck or Slideshare) that a great place to start if you’re just getting started is DevStack. Here, Brent Salisbury has a nice write-up on using DevStack to install OpenStack Grizzly.

Operating Systems/Applications

  • Boxen, a tool created by GitHub to manage their OS X Mountain Lion laptops for developers, looks interesting. Might be a useful tool for other environments, too.
  • If you use TextMate2 (I switched to BBEdit a little while ago after being a long-time TextMate user), you might enjoy this quick post by Colin McNamara on Puppet syntax highlighting using TextMate2.

Storage

  • Anyone have more information on Jeda Networks? They’ve been mentioned a couple of times on GigaOm (here and here), but I haven’t seen anything concrete yet. Hey, Stephen Foskett, if you’re reading: get Jeda Networks to the next Tech Field Day.
  • Tim Patterson shares some code from Luc Dekens that helps check VMFS version and block sizes using PowerCLI. This could come in quite handy in making sure you know how your datastores are configured, especially if you are in the midst of a migration or have inherited an environment from someone else.

Virtualization

  • Interested in using SAML and Horizon Workspace with vCloud Director? Tom Fojta shows you how.
  • If you aren’t using vSphere Host Profiles, this write-up on the VMware SMB blog might convince you why you should and show you how to get started.
  • Michael Webster tackles the question: is now the best time to upgrade to vSphere 5.1? Read the full post to see what Michael has to say about it.
  • Duncan points out an easy error to make when working with vSphere HA heartbeat datastores in this post. Key takeaway: sometimes the fix is a lot simpler than we might think at first. (I know I’m guilty of making things more complicated than they need to be at times. Aren’t we all?)
  • Jon Benedict (aka “Captain KVM”) shares a script he wrote to help provide high availability for RHEV-M.
  • Chris Wahl has a nice write-up on using log shipping to protect your vCenter database. It’s a bit over a year old (surprised I missed it until now), and—as Chris points out—log shipping doesn’t protect the database (primary and secondary copies) against corruption. However, it’s better than nothing (which I suspect it what far too many people are using).

Other

  • If you aspire to be a writer—whether that be a blogger, author, journalist, or other—you might find this article on using the DASH method for writing to be helpful. The six tips at the end of the article are especially helpful, I think.

Time to wrap this up for now; the rest will have to wait until the next Technology Short Take. Until then, feel free to share your thoughts, questions, or rants in the comments below. Courteous comments are always welcome!

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Welcome to Technology Short Take #32, the latest installment in my irregularly-published series of link collections, thoughts, rants, raves, and miscellaneous information. I try to keep the information linked to data center technologies like networking, storage, virtualization, and the like, but occasionally other items slip through. I hope you find something useful.

Networking

  • Ranga Maddipudi (@vCloudNetSec on Twitter) has put together two blog posts on vCloud Networking and Security’s App Firewall (part 1 and part 2). These two posts are detailed, hands-on, step-by-step guides to using the vCNS App firewall—good stuff if you aren’t familiar with the product or haven’t had the opportunity to really use it.
  • The sentiment behind this post isn’t unique to networking (or networking engineers), but that was the original audience so I’m including it in this section. Nick Buraglio climbs on his SDN soapbox to tell networking professionals that changes in the technology field are part of life—but then provides some specific examples of how this has happened in the past. I particularly appreciated the latter part, as it helps people relate to the fact that they have undergone notable technology transitions in the past but probably just don’t realize it. As I said, this doesn’t just apply to networking folks, but to everyone in IT. Good post, Nick.
  • Some good advice here on scaling/sizing VXLAN in VMware deployments (as well as some useful background information to help explain the advice).
  • Jason Edelman goes on a thought journey connecting some dots around network APIs, abstractions, and consumption models. I’ll let you read his post for all the details, but I do agree that it is important for the networking industry to converge on a consistent set of abstractions. Jason and I disagree that OpenStack Networking (formerly Quantum) should be the basis here; he says it shouldn’t be (not well-known in the enterprise), I say it should be (already represents work created collaboratively by multiple vendors and allows for different back-end implementations).
  • Need a reasonable introduction to OpenFlow? This post gives a good introduction to OpenFlow, and the author takes care to define OpenFlow as accurately and precisely as possible.
  • SDN, NFV—what’s the difference? This post does a reasonable job of explaining the differences (and the relationship) between SDN and NFV.

Servers/Hardware

  • Chris Wahl provides a quick overview of the HP Moonshot servers, HP’s new ARM-based offerings. I think that Chris may have accidentally overlooked the fact that these servers are not x86-based; therefore, a hypervisor such as vSphere is not supported. Linux distributions that offer ARM support, though—like Ubuntu, RHEL, and SuSE—are supported, however. The target market for this is massively parallel workloads that will benefit from having many different cores available. It will be interesting to see how the support of a “Tier 1″ hardware vendor like HP affects the adoption of ARM in the enterprise.

Security

  • Ivan Pepelnjak talks about a demonstration of an attack based on VM BPDU spoofing. In vSphere 5.1, VMware addressed this potential issue with a feature called BPDU Filter. Check out how to configure BPDU Filter here.

Cloud Computing/Cloud Management

  • Check out this post for some vCloud Director and RHEL 6.x interoperability issues.
  • Nick Hardiman has a good write-up on the anatomy of an AWS CloudFormation template.
  • If you missed the OpenStack Summit in Portland, Cody Bunch has a reasonable collection of Summit summary posts here (as well as materials for his hands-on workshops here). I was also there, and I have some session live blogs available for your pleasure.
  • We’ve probably all heard the “pets vs. cattle” argument applied to virtual machines in a cloud computing environment, but Josh McKenty of Piston Cloud Computing asks whether it is now time to apply that thinking to the physical hosts as well. Considering that the IT industry still seems to be struggling with applying this line of thinking to virtual systems, I suspect it might be a while before it applies to physical servers. However, Josh’s arguments are valid, and definitely worth considering.
  • I have to give Rob Hirschfeld some credit for—as a member of the OpenStack Board—acknowledging that, in his words, “we’ve created such a love fest for OpenStack that I fear we are drinking our own kool aide.” Open, honest, transparent dealings and self-assessments are critically important for a project like OpenStack to succeed, so kudos to Rob for posting a list of some of the challenges facing the project as adoption, visibility, and development accelerate.

Operating Systems/Applications

Nothing this time around, but I’ll stay alert for items to add next time.

Storage

  • Nigel Poulton tackles the question of whether ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit) use in storage arrays elongates the engineering cycles needed to add new features. This “double edged sword” argument is present in networking as well, but this is the first time I can recall seeing the question asked about modern storage arrays. While Nigel’s article specifically refers to the 3PAR ASIC and its relationship to “flash as cache” functionality, the broader question still stands: at what point do the drawbacks of ASICs begin to outweight the benefits?
  • Quite some time ago I pointed readers to a post about Target Driven Zoning from Erik Smith at EMC. Erik recently announced that TDZ works after a successful test run in a lab. Awesome—here’s hoping the vendors involved will push this into the market.
  • Using iSER (iSCSI Extensions for RDMA) to accelerate iSCSI traffic seems to offer some pretty promising storage improvements (see this article), but I can’t help but feel like this is a really complex solution that may not offer a great deal of value moving forward. Is it just me?

Virtualization

  • Kevin Barrass has a blog post on the VMware Community site that shows you how to create VXLAN segments and then use Wireshark to decode and view the VXLAN traffic, all using VMware Workstation.
  • Andre Leibovici explains how Horizon View Multi-VLAN works and how to configure it.
  • Looking for a good list of virtualization and cloud podcasts? Look no further.
  • Need Visio stencils for VMware? Look no further.
  • It doesn’t look like it has changed much from previous versions, but nevertheless some people might find it useful: a “how to” on virtualization with KVM on CentOS 6.4.
  • Captain KVM (cute name, a take-off of Captain Caveman for those who didn’t catch it) has a couple of posts on maximizing 10Gb Ethernet on KVM and RHEV (the KVM post is here, the RHEV post is here). I’m not sure that I agree with his description of LACP bonds (“2 10GbE links become a single 20GbE link”), since any given flow in a LACP configuration can still only use 1 link out of the bond. It’s more accurate to say that aggregate bandwidth increases, but that’s a relatively minor nit overall.
  • Ben Armstrong has a write-up on how to install Hyper-V’s integration components when the VM is offline.
  • What are the differences between QuickPrep and Sysprep? Jason Boche’s got you covered.

I suppose that’s enough information for now. As always, courteous comments are welcome, so feel free to add your thoughts in the comments below. Thanks for reading!

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You might have seen that the second edition of VMware vSphere Design was recently released. How would you like to win a free copy?

Starting today (no, this isn’t an April Fool’s joke) and running through April 15, you can enter to win a signed print copy of VMware vSphere Design, 2nd Edition! I’m giving away a free, signed copy of the book to five lucky individuals who enter and win in this book giveaway contest.

Here’s how to enter to win one of the 5 free, signed copies of the book: simply post a comment on this site telling me why you would find this book useful. Yes, that’s it!

There are a few contest rules you’ll want to note:

  • You’ll need to use a valid e-mail address when you post your comment, because if you’re a winner I’ll be contacting you via e-mail to get your shipping information.
  • If I notify you via e-mail that you’ve been selected to win a copy but you fail to respond within 48 hours with your shipping address, I’ll select a new winner in your place.
  • Because I’m paying for the shipping out of my own pocket, I’ll have to limit this contest to continental US residents only. (Sorry folks—my personal budget can’t sustain sending print books worldwide.)

Aside from the limitation to continental US residents only, this contest is open to anyone, so don’t hesitate—enter today!

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I’ve been phenomenally lucky to be involved in a number of book projects around VMware vSphere. I think that most people probably know me for the wildly popular Mastering VMware vSphere 4 and Mastering VMware vSphere 5 books (released at VMworld 2009 and VMworld EMEA 2011, respectively), but in late 2010/early 2011 I also had the opportunity to collaborate with Forbes Guthrie and Maish Saidel-Keesing on VMware vSphere Design. Even though that book hasn’t sold as many units as the Mastering books, it’s a work of which I’m equally proud. The topic of designing vSphere environments can be difficult to address, but I think we did a pretty good job.

Today I’m excited to announce that Forbes Guthrie and I–along with some support from Kendrick Coleman–have undertaken a revision of that book, to be released as VMware vSphere Design, 2nd Edition.

VMware vSphere Design, 2nd Edition

In addition to a new cover design (nice, huh?), this new version of the book has a new interior as well! The book has been thoroughly updated to include design topics and considerations for vSphere 4, vSphere 5, and vSphere 5.1. In addition to discussing design topics like management, storage, networking, and security, Kendrick contributed content around design considerations for vCloud Director. The updated and expanded content makes this a great resource for anyone who will be designing VMware vSphere environments.

For more information about the book, or to see a list of resellers for the book, visit the publisher’s page.

Thanks, and I think I speak for Forbes and Kendrick when I say that we hope this resource is useful to you!

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