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CoreOS Continued: Fleet and Docker

This post is the third in a series of posts on CoreOS, this time focusing on the use of fleet and Docker to deploy containers across a cluster of systems. This post builds on my earlier introduction to CoreOS and the subsequent more in-depth look at etcd.

I’m assuming that you’re already reasonably familiar with CoreOS, etcd, and Docker. If you aren’t familiar with CoreOS or etcd, have a look at the links in the previous paragraph. If you need a quick introduction to Docker, check out this quick introduction to Docker. While the example I’m going to provide here is fairly simple, it should serve as a reasonable basis upon which to build later.

An Overview of Fleet

The GitHub page for fleet describes it as a “distributed init system” that operates across a cluster of machines instead of on a single machine. It leverages etcd, the distributed key-value store that ships with CoreOS, as well as systemd. Fleet combines etcd and systemd to allow users to deploy containers (configured as systemd units) across a cluster of CoreOS systems.

Using fleet, users can deploy a single container anywhere on the cluster, deploy multiple copies of the same container, ensure that containers run on the same machine (or different machines), or maintain a certain number of instances of a service (thus protecting against failure).

Note that even though fleet helps with scheduling containers across a cluster of systems, fleet doesn’t address some of the other significant challenges that arise from an architecture based on distributed micro-services in containers. Namely, fleet does not address inter-container communications, service registration, service discovery, or any form of advanced utilization-based scheduling. These are topics I hope to be able to explore here in the near future.

Now that you have an idea of what fleet does, let’s take a closer look at actually using fleet.

Interacting with Fleet

By default, the fleetctl command-line client that is provided to interact with fleet assumes it will be interacting with a local etcd endpoint on the loopback address. So, if you want to run fleetctl on an instance of CoreOS in your cluster, no further configuration is needed.

However, it may be easier/more effective to use fleetctl from outside the cluster. There are a couple of different ways to do this: you can tell fleetctl to use a specific endpoint, or you can tunnel the traffic through SSH. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages; I’ll leave it to the readers to determine which approach is the best approach for their specific configurations/situations.

Using a Custom Endpoint

This method is pretty straightforward and simple. Just set an environment variable named FLEETCTL_ENDPOINT, like this:

export FLEETCTL_ENDPOINT=http://10.1.1.7:4001

Obviously, you’d want to make sure that you have the correct IP address (can be any node in the etcd cluster) and port (4001 is the default, I believe). With this environment variable set, now anytime you use fleetctl it will direct traffic to the endpoint you specified. If that specific node in the etcd cluster becomes unavailable, then fleetctl will stop working, and you’ll need to point it to a different node in the cluster.

Tunneling Through SSH

The second way of using fleetctl remotely is to tunnel the traffic through SSH. This method may be a bit more complicated, but naturally offers a bit more security.

To make fleetctl tunnel its communications with etcd through SSH, set an environment variable called FLEETCTL_TUNNEL to the IP address of any node in the etcd cluster, like this:

export FLEETCTL_TUNNEL=10.1.1.7

However, the configuration involves more than just setting the environment variable. The fleetctl doesn’t expose any options to configure the SSH connection, and it assumes you’ll be using public key authentication. This means you’ll need access to a public key that will work against the nodes in your etcd cluster. If you followed my instructions on deploying CoreOS on OpenStack via Heat, then you can review the Heat template to see which key was specified to be injected when the instances were spawned. Once you know which key was used, then you’ll need to either:

  • place that key on the system where fleetctl is installed, or
  • install fleetctl on a system that already has that key present.

There’s still at least one more step required (possibly two). Because fleetctl doesn’t expose any SSH options, you’re going to need to run an SSH agent on the system you’re using. OS X provides an SSH agent by default, but on Linux systems you will probably have to manually run an SSH agent and add the appropriate SSH key:

eval `ssh-agent -s`
ssh-add ~/.ssh/keyfile.pem

Once the SSH agent is running and the appropriate key is loaded (you’d clearly need to make sure the path and filename are correct in the command listed above), then the last step is to configure your ~/.ssh/config file with options for the CoreOS instances. It’s possible you might be able to get by without this step; I haven’t conducted enough testing to say with absolute certainty one way or another. I suspect it will be needed.

In the ~/.ssh/config file, add a stanza for the system through which you’ll be tunneling the fleetctl traffic. The stanza will need to look something like this:

Host node-01
  User core
  Hostname 10.1.1.7
  IdentityFile ~/.ssh/keyfile.pem

This configuration stanza ensures that when the system you’re using attempts to communicate with the IP address listed above, it will use the specified username and public key. Since the SSH agent is loaded, it won’t prompt for any password for the public key (even if the public key doesn’t have a password associated, you’ll still need the SSH agent), and the SSH connection will be successful without any user interaction. That last point is important—fleetctl doesn’t expose any SSH options, so the connection needs to be completely automatic.

Once you have all these pieces in place, then you can simply run fleetctl with the appropriate commands (described in the next section), and the connection to the etcd cluster will happen over SSH via the specified host. Naturally, if that node in the cluster goes away or is unavailable, you’ll need to point your connection to a different node in the etcd cluster.

Using Fleet

Once you have access to the etcd cluster via fleetctl using one of the three methods described above (direct access via a CoreOS instance, setting a custom endpoint, or tunneling over SSH), then you’re ready to start exploring how fleet works.

First, you can list all the machines in the cluster with this command:

fleetctl list-machines

Note the “METADATA” column; this allows you to do some custom scheduling by associating systemd units with specific metadata parameters. Metadata can be assigned either via cloud-config parameters passed when the instance is spawned, or via modifications to the fleet config files.

To see the units about which the cluster knows, use this command:

fleetctl list-units

If you’re just getting your etcd cluster up and running, the output of this command is probably empty. Let’s deploy a unit that spawns a Docker container running the popular Nginx web server. Here’s a (very) simple unit file that will spin up an Nginx container via Docker:

(If you can’t see the code block above, click here.)

With this file in place on the system where you are running fleetctl, you can submit this to the etcd cluster with this command:

fleetctl submit nginx.service

Then, when you run fleetctl list-units, you’ll see the new unit submitted (but not started). Start it with fleetctl start nginx.service.

Where fleet becomes really useful (in my opinion) is when you want to run multiple units across the cluster. If you take the simple Nginx unit I showed you earlier and extend it slightly, you get this:

(Click here if you can’t see the code block above.)

Note the difference here: the Docker container name is changed (to nginx-01) and the filename is different (now nginx.1.service). If you make multiple copies of this file, changing the Docker container name and the unit filename, you can submit all of the units to the etcd cluster at the same time. For example, let’s say you wanted to run 3 Nginx containers on the cluster. Make three copies of the file (nginx.1.service, nginx.2.service, and nginx.3.service), modifying the container name in each copy. Make sure that you have the “X-Conflicts” line in there; that tells fleet not to place two Nginx containers on the same system in the cluster. Then submit them with this command:

fleetctl submit nginx.*.service

And start (launch) them with this command:

fleetctl start nginx.*.service

Give it a few minutes to download the latest Nginx Docker image (assuming it isn’t already downloaded), then run fleetctl list-units and you should see three Nginx containers distributed across three different CoreOS instances in the etcd cluster, all listed as “loaded” and “active”. (You can then test connectivity to those Nginx instances using something like curl.) Congratulations—you’ve just deployed multiple containers automatically across a cluster of systems!

(Want to see some of the magic behind fleet? Run etcdctl --peers <IP address of cluster node>:4001 ls /_coreos.com --recursive and see what’s displayed. You’re welcome.)

Admittedly, this is a very simple example. However, the basic architecture I’ve shown you here can be extended. For example, by using additional fleet-specific properties like “X-ConditionMachineOf” in your unit file(s), you can run what is known as a “sidekick container.” These containers do things like update an external load balancer, or register the presence of the “primary” container in some sort of service discovery mechanism. (In fact, as I alluded to in my etcd post, you could use etcd as that service discovery mechanism.)

Naturally, fleetctl includes commands for stopping units, destroying units, etc., as well as submitting and starting units. You can use fleetctl help to get more information, or visit the fleet GitHub page.

I hope you’ve found this post to be helpful. Feel free to post any questions, corrections, clarifications, or thoughts in the comments below. Courteous comments are always welcome.

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CoreOS Continued: etcd

In this post, I’m going to build on my earlier introduction to CoreOS by taking a slightly more detailed look at etcd. etcd is a distributed key-value store (more on that in a moment) and is one of the key technologies that I feel distinguishes CoreOS from other Linux distributions.

etcd is not, of course, the only distributed key-value store in town. Zookeeper is another very well-known distributed information store. I’m focusing on etcd here for two reasons. First, it’s distributed as part of CoreOS, which means that it isn’t necessarily a separate piece of software that you have to install and configure (although some configuration is needed, as I’ll attempt to show). Second, future blog posts will talk about tools like fleet and others that are being built to leverage etcd, so I want to provide this overview here as a foundation for later posts.

Data Organization in etcd

As I’ve mentioned already, etcd is a distributed key-value store. The data within etcd is organized hierarchically, somewhat like a file system. The top of the hierarchy is “/” (root), and from there users can create paths and keys (with values). Later in this post, I’ll show you how that’s done using both the RESTful etcd API as well as using the etcdctl command-line client.

First, though, let’s look at an example. Let’s say that you wanted to store information about IP endpoints that were running a particular service. You could organize the data within etcd like this:

/ (root, already exists when etcd starts)
/svclocation (path or directory within etcd)
/svclocation/instance1 = 10.1.1.20 (a key in etcd and it’s associated value)
/svclocation/instance2 = 10.1.1.21 (another key and associated value)

Because etcd is a distributed key-value store, both the organization of the information as well as the actual information is distributed across all the members of an etcd cluster. If you’re interested in more details on exactly how the data is propagated within an etcd cluster, see here.

Configuration of etcd

etcd can be configured via command-line flags, environment variables, or configuration file. By default, etcd on CoreOS uses a configuration file generated by cloud-init to set environment variables that affect how etcd operates. My earlier post on deploying CoreOS on OpenStack with Heat provides a brief example of using cloud-init to configure etcd on CoreOS during deployment.

For example, when you configure the addr, peer-addr, or discovery properties via cloud-init, CoreOS puts those values into a file named 20-cloudinit.conf in the /run/systemd/system/etcd.service.d/ directory. That file takes those values and assigns them to the ETCD_ADDR, ETCD_PEER_ADDR, and ETCD_DISCOVERY environment variables, respectively. etcd will read those environment variables when it starts, thus controlling the configuration of etcd. (By the way, the use of the etcd.service.d directory for configuration files is a systemd thing.)

Interacting with etcd

Like most projects these days, etcd provides a RESTful API by which you can interact with it. You can use the command-line utility curl to interact with etcd, using some of the techniques I outlined in this post on interacting with RESTful APIs. Here’s a very simple example: using curl to recursively list the keys and values in a path within etcd:

curl -X GET http://10.1.1.7:4001/v2/keys/?consistent=true&recursive=true&sorted=false

If you want to store some data in etcd (let’s say you wanted to store the value “10.1.1.20:80″ at the key “/svclocation”), then you’d do something like this:

curl -L http://10.1.1.7:4001/v2/keys/svclocation -X PUT -d value="10.1.1.20:80"

The JSON response (read this if you’re unfamiliar with JSON) will provide confirmation that the key and value were set, along with some additional information.

To read this value back, you’d use curl like this:

curl -L http://10.1.1.7:4001/v2/keys/svclocation

etcd would respond with a JSON-formatted response that provides the current value of the specified key.

However, to make it easier, there is a command-line client called etcdctl that you can use to interact with etcd. There are both Linux and OS X versions available from the etcd GitHub page; just make sure you download the version that corresponds to the version of etcd that’s running on your CoreOS instance(s). (To determine the version of etcd running on a CoreOS instance, log into the CoreOS instance via SSH and run etcd --version.)

Then, to perform the same listing of keys action as the curl command I provided earlier, you would run this command:

etcdctl --peers 10.1.1.7:4001 ls / --recursive

Similarly, to set a value at a particular key within etcd:

etcdctl --peers 10.1.1.7:4001 mk /svclocation 10.1.1.20:80

And to get a value:

etcdctl --peers 10.1.1.7:4001 get /svclocation

A couple of points to note:

  • By default, etcdctl works against a local instance of etcd. In other words, it defaults to connecting to 127.0.0.1:4001. You’ll have to use the --peers flag if you’re running it external to a CoreOS instance. However, if you’re running it directly from a CoreOS instance, you can omit the --peers flag.
  • You can point etcdctl against any CoreOS instance in an etcd cluster, because the information stored in etcd is shared and distributed across all the members of the cluster. (That’s kind of the whole point behind it.) Note that the --peers option supports listing multiple peers in an etcd cluster.

By now, you might be thinking, “OK, this is interesting, but what does it really do for me?” By itself…not necessarily a whole lot. Where etcd starts to become quite useful is when there are other systems that start to leverage information stored in etcd. A couple of examples come to mind:

  1. Distributed micro-service architectures—where applications are made up of a group of containerized services distributed across a compute farm—need mechanisms for service registration (registering that a particular service is available) and service discovery (finding out where a particular service is running). etcd could be helpful in assisting with both of these tasks (writing key-value pairs into etcd for registration, reading them back for discovery).

  2. “Converting” etcd information into traditional configuration files allows applications that are not etcd-aware to still take advantage of etcd’s distributed architecture. For example, there is a project called confd that takes information stored in etcd and turns it into “standard” configuration files. This means, for example, that you could store dynamic configuration details in etcd, and then use confd to update static configuration files. (A common example of using this is updating an HAProxy configuration file via confd as back-end web server containers start up and shut down. Astute readers will recognize this as a form of service registration and service discovery.)

I’ll be building on some of these concepts in future posts. In the meantime, feel free to post any questions, clarifications, or corrections in the comments below.

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In this post, I’m going to illustrate one way to deploy CoreOS on OpenStack using Heat. By no means is this intended to be seen as the only way to use Heat to deploy CoreOS, but rather as one way of using Heat to deploy CoreOS. I’m publishing this in the hopes that others will be able to use this as a building block for their own deployments.

If you aren’t already familiar with OpenStack Heat or CoreOS, you might want to take a moment and refer to this introductory posts for some foundational information:

Moving forward, OpenStack Heat is trying to standardize on OpenStack resource types (like OS::Nova::Server) and the HOT format (using YAML). Therefore, the Heat template I’m presenting here will use OpenStack resource types and YAML. Note that it’s certainly possible to do this using CloudFormation (CFN) resource types and JSON formatting. I’ll leave the conversion of the template found here into CFN/JSON as an exercise for the readers.

Here’s the example Heat template you can use to deploy and customize CoreOS on OpenStack:

(Click here if you can’t see the code block above.)

Let’s walk through this template real quick:

  • On line 9, you’ll need to provide the ID for the Neutron network to which the new CoreOS instance(s) should connect. You can get this a couple of different ways; running neutron net-list is one way.
  • On line 14, you’ll need to supply the ID for the CoreOS image you’ve uploaded into Glance. Again, there are multiple ways to obtain this; running glance image-list is one way of getting that information.
  • On line 22, replace the text (including the “<” and “>” symbols) with the ID of the security group you want applied to the CoreOS instance(s) being deployed. The neutron security-group-list command can give you the information you need to put here.
  • On line 31, supply the name of the SSH key you want to inject into the instance(s).
  • On line 37, you’ll need to generate a unique cluster ID to place here for the configuration of etcd within the CoreOS instance(s). You can generate a new ID (also called a token) by visiting https://discovery.etcd.io/new. That will return another URL that contains the new etcd cluster token. Supply that token here to create a new etcd cluster out of the CoreOS instance(s) you’re deploying with this template.
  • This template only deploys a single CoreOS instance. To deploy multiple CoreOS instances, you’ll need a separate OS::Neutron::Port and OS::Nova::Server resource for each instance. For each Neutron port, you can reference the same security group ID and network ID. For each instance, you can reference the same Glance image ID, same SSH key, and same etcd cluster token; the only thing that would change with each instance is line 30. Line 30 should point to a unique Neutron port resource created for each instance (something like instance1_port0, instance2_port0, etc.).

Now, there are obviously lots of other things you could do here—you could create your own Neutron network to host these CoreOS instances, you could create a logical router to provide external connectivity (which is required, by the way, in order for the etcd cluster token discovery to work correctly), and you could create and assign floating IPs to the instances. Examples of some of these tasks are in the articles I provided earlier; others are left as an exercise for the reader. (Or I’ll write up something later. We’ll see.)

Once you have your template, you can deploy the stack using Heat, and then—after your CoreOS cluster is up and running—begin to deploy applications to the cluster using tools like fleet. That, my friends, is another story for another day.

Any questions? Corrections? Clarifications? Feel free to start (or join) the discussion below. All courteous comments are welcome.

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Some time ago, I introduced you to the idea of Linux network namespaces, and provided an overview of some of the commands needed to interact with network namespaces. In this post, I’ll follow up on that post with some additional information on using network namespaces with other types of network interfaces.

In the previous network namespaces article, I mentioned (incorrectly, it turns out) that you had to use virtual Ethernet (veth) interfaces in order to connect a namespace to the physical network:

It turns out you can only assign virtual Ethernet (veth) interfaces to a network namespace.

I say “incorrectly” because you are able to assign more than just virtual Ethernet interfaces to a Linux network namespace. I’m not sure why I arrived at that conclusion, because subsequent testing—using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS as with the original testing—showed no problem assigning physical interfaces to a particular network namespace. The VMs I used for the subsequent testing are using a different kernel (the 3.11 kernel instead of whatever I used in the previous testing), so it’s entirely possible that’s the difference. If I get the opportunity, I’ll try with earlier kernel builds to see if that makes any difference.

In any case, assigning other types of network interfaces to a network namespace is just like assigning veth interfaces. First, you create the network namespace:

ip netns add <new namespace name>

Then, you’d assign the interface to the namespace:

ip link set <device name> netns <namespace name>

For example, if you wanted to assign eth1 to the “blue” namespace, you’d run this:

ip link set eth1 netns blue

Please note that I haven’t found a way to unassign an interface from a network namespace other than deleting the namespace entirely.

If you want to assign a VLAN interface to a namespace, the process is slightly different. You’ll have to create the namespace first, as with physical and veth interfaces, but you’ll also have to create the VLAN interface in the “default” namespace first, then move it over to the desired namespace.

For example, first you’d create the namespace “red”:

ip netns add red

Then you’d create the VLAN interface for VLAN 100 on physical interface eth1:

ip link add link eth1 name eth1.100 type vlan id 100

The generic form of this command is this:

ip link add link <physical device> name <VLAN device name> type vlan id <VLAN ID>

Note that you can’t use ip netns exec to run the command to create the VLAN interface in the network namespace directly; it won’t work because the parent interface upon which the VLAN interface is based doesn’t exist in the namespace. So you’ll create the VLAN interface in the default namespace first, then move it over.

Once the VLAN interface is created, then move it to the target namespace:

ip link set eth1.100 netns red

One (sort of) interesting thing I noted in my testing was that link status and IP addresses don’t move between namespaces. Therefore, don’t bother assigning an IP address or setting the link state of an interface before you move it to the final namespace, because you’ll just have to do it again.

To make the interface functional inside the target namespace, you’ll use ip netns exec to target the specific configuration commands against the desired namespace. For example, if the VLAN interface eth1.100 exists in the namespace “blue”, you’d run these commands:

ip netns exec blue ip addr add 10.1.1.1/24 dev eth1.100

That adds the IP address to the interface in the namespace; then you’d use this command to set the link status to up:

ip netns exec blue ip link set eth1.100 up

Then you can test network connectivity with our good friend ping like this:

ip netns exec blue ping -c 4 10.1.1.2

(Obviously, you’d want to substitute an appropriate IP address there for your specific configuration and environment.)

I hope this additional information on working with Linux network namespaces is useful. As always, I invite and encourage any questions, thoughts, or corrections in the comments below. All courteous comments are welcome!

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In this post, I’m going to talk about a way to modify QCOW2-based images without having to boot up a full-blown virtual machine based on the image. I found this process while trying to change the behavior of cloud-init on the official Ubuntu cloud images from Canonical.

While I had successfully built my own Ubuntu 12.04 LTS image for my OpenStack-based home lab (and it worked just fine), I was keen to use Canonical’s official cloud images as they were much smaller (around 250MB versus 1.5GB for my home-built image). Given that disk space is at a bit of a premium in my home lab, using the smaller images would be quite beneficial. The problem was that cloud-init wasn’t configured to operate in a way that worked for my home lab environment.

The question, of course, was…how do I do this? I tried a couple different approaches:

  1. I installed VirtualBox on one of my OS X systems, because I knew VirtualBox supported QCOW2 images. Unfortunately, trying to launch a VM using one of the official cloud images as a root disk failed. (I presume this is because the cloud images assume the use of the virtio block driver, which VirtualBox doesn’t support.)

  2. Next, I installed a plain jane Ubuntu VM in VirtualBox and attached the official cloud image QCOW2 file as a second hard disk. That didn’t work either; the Ubuntu VM refused to recognize the filesystem(s) on the QCOW2 image.

I was about at my wits’ end when I found this post. Aha! I’d heard of guestfish before, but I hadn’t thought to try it in this instance. Guestfish is part of the larger libguestfs project.

So I tried the instructions in the post I’d found. Unfortunately, it failed the first time I tried, but I later—thanks to qemu-img check—found that the Ubuntu 12.04 cloud image I’d downloaded was somehow damaged/corrupted. Using a new download of the image was successful.

Here are the steps I used to modify the contents of a QCOW2 disk image using guestfish:

  1. Starting from a vanilla Ubuntu 12.04 LTS install, use apt-get update and apt-get install guestfish to install guestfish. (You’ll probably need/want to use sudo with both of these commands.)

  2. During the installation of guestfish, you can select to create a “virtual appliance” that guestfish uses. If you choose not to do this during installation, you can always do it later with sudo update-guestfs-appliance.

  3. Once guestfish is installed and the virtual appliance is created/updated, launch guestfish itself with sudo guestfish. Note that if you don’t have root privileges or don’t use sudo, guestfish will still launch and act like everything is working—but it will fail. Once guestfish is up and running, you’ll be sitting at a “> <fs>” prompt.

  4. Type add <QCOW2 image filename> (obviously substituting the full path and correct filename for the QCOW2 image you’d like to modify).

  5. Type run and press Enter. You’ll see a progress bar that updates the status of the guestfs virtual appliance. Once it’s complete, you’ll be returned to the “> <fs>” prompt.

  6. Enter list-filesystems. Guestfish should return a list of filesystems on the QCOW2 disk image. In the case of the official Canonical cloud images, only “/dev/vda1″ is returned.

  7. To gain access to the filesystem in the QCOW2 image, enter mount <device specification> <guestfish mount point>. For example, when I was modifying the Canonical cloud images, I used mount /dev/vda1 /. Keep in mind you’re not mounting to the system on which guestfish is running; you’re mounting to the guestfish virtual appliance.

  8. Now just edit the files in the QCOW2 image using whatever method you prefer. In my case, I needed to edit /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg, so I just used vi to edit the file and make whatever changes were needed.

  9. When you’re done, type exit to quit guestfish and commit changes to the QCOW2 image.

And that’s it! Using this technique I was able to quickly and easily modify the Ubuntu cloud images so that cloud-init behaved in the way that I wanted.

Hopefully this information helps someone else. If you have any questions or corrections, I invite you to share in the comments below.

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It seems as if APIs are popping up everywhere these days. While this isn’t a bad thing, it does mean that IT professionals need to have a better understanding of how to interact with these APIs. In this post, I’m going to discuss how to use the popular command line utility curl to interact with a couple of RESTful APIs—specifically, the OpenStack APIs and the VMware NSX API.

Before I go any further, I want to note that to work with the OpenStack and VMware NSX APIs you’ll be sending and receiving information in JSON (JavaScript Object Notation). If you aren’t familiar with JSON, don’t worry—I’ve have an introductory post on JSON that will help get you up to speed. (Mac users might also find this post helpful as well.)

Also, please note that this post is not intended to be a comprehensive reference to the (quite extensive) flexibility of curl. My purpose here is to provide enough of a basic reference to get you started. The rest is up to you!

To make consuming this information easier (I hope), I’ll break this information down into a series of examples. Let’s start with passing some JSON data to a REST API to authenticate.

Example 1: Authenticating to OpenStack

Let’s say you’re working with an OpenStack-based cloud, and you need to authenticate to OpenStack using OpenStack Identity (“Keystone”). Keystone uses the idea of tokens, and to obtain a token you have to pass correct credentials. Here’s how you would perform that task using curl.

You’re going to use a couple of different command-line options:

  • The “-d” option allows us to pass data to the remote server (in this example, the remote server running OpenStack Identity). We can either embed the data in the command or pass the data using a file; I’ll show you both variations.
  • The “-H” option allows you to add an HTTP header to the request.

If you want to embed the authentication credentials into the command line, then your command would look something like this:

curl -d '{"auth":{"passwordCredentials":{"username": "admin",
"password": "secret"},"tenantName": "customer-A"}}'
-H "Content-Type: application/json" http://192.168.100.100:5000/v2.0/tokens

I’ve wrapped the text above for readability, but on the actual command line it would all run together with no breaks. (So don’t try to copy and paste, it probably won’t work.) You’ll naturally want to substitute the correct values for the username, password, tenant, and OpenStack Identity URL.

As you might have surmised by the use of the “-H” header in that command, the authentication data you’re passing via the “-d” parameter is actually JSON. (Run it through python -m json.tool and see.) Because it’s actually JSON, you could just as easily put this information into a file and pass it to the server that way. Let’s say you put this information (which you could format for easier readability) into a file named credentials.json. Then the command would look something like this (you might need to include the full path to the file):

curl -d @credentials.json -H "Content-Type: application/json" http://192.168.100.100:35357/v2.0/tokens

What you’ll get back from OpenStack—assuming your command is successful—is a wealth of JSON. I highly recommend piping the output through python -m json.tool as it can be difficult to read otherwise. (Alternately, you could pipe the output into a file.) Of particular usefulness in the returned JSON is a section that gives you a token ID. Using this token ID, you can prove that you’ve authenticated to OpenStack, which allows you to run subsequent commands (like listing tenants, users, etc.).

Example 2: Authenticating to VMware NSX

Not all RESTful APIs handle authentication in the same way. In the previous example, I showed you how to pass some credentials in JSON-encoded format to authenticate. However, some systems use other methods for authentication. VMware NSX is one example.

In this example, you’ll need to use a different set of curl command-line options:

  • The “–insecure” option tells curl to ignore HTTPS certificate validation. VMware NSX controllers only listen on HTTPS (not HTTP).
  • The “-c” option stores data received by the server (one of the NSX controllers, in this case) into a cookie file. You’ll then re-use this data in subsequent commands with the “-b” option.
  • The “-X” option allows you to specify the HTTP method, which normally defaults to GET. In this case, you’ll use the POST method along the the “-d” parameter you saw earlier to pass authentication data to the NSX controller.

Putting all this together, the command to authenticate to VMware NSX would look something like this (naturally you’d want to substitute the correct username and password where applicable):

curl --insecure -c cookies.txt -X POST -d 'username=admin&password=admin' https://192.168.100.50/ws.v1/login

Example 3: Gathering Information from OpenStack

Once you’ve gotten an authentication token from OpenStack as I showed you in example #1 above, then you can start using API requests to get information from OpenStack.

For example, let’s say you wanted to list the instances for a particular tenant. Once you’ve authenticated, you’d want to get the ID for the tenant in question, so you’d need to ask OpenStack to give you a list of the tenants (you’ll only see the tenants your credentials permit). The command to do that would look something like this:

curl -H "X-Auth-Token: <Token ID>" http://192.168.100.70:5000/v2.0/tenants

The value to be substituted for token ID in the above command is returned by OpenStack when you authenticate (that’s why it’s important to pay attention to the data being returned). In this case, the data returned by the command will be a JSON-encoded list of tenants, tenant IDs, and tenant descriptions. From that data, you can get the ID of the tenant for whom you’d like to list the instances, then use a command like this:

curl -H "X-Auth-Token: <Token ID>" http://192.168.100.70:8774/v2/<Tenant ID>/servers

This will return a stream of JSON-encoded data that includes the list of instances and each instance’s unique ID—which you could then use to get more detailed information about that instance:

curl -H "X-Auth-Token: <Token ID>" http://192.168.100.70:8774/v2/<Tenant ID>/servers/<Server ID>

By and large, the API is reasonably well-documented; you just need to be sure that you are pointing the API call against the right endpoint. For example, authentication has to happen against the server running Keystone, which may or may not be the same server that is running the Nova API services. (In the examples I just provided, Keystone and the Nova API services are running on the same host, which is why the IP address is the same in the command lines.)

Example 4: Creating Objects in VMware NSX

Getting information from VMware NSX using the RESTful API is very much like what you’ve already seen in getting information from OpenStack. Of course, the API can also be used to create objects. To create objects—such as logical switches, logical switch ports, or ACLs—you’ll use a combination of curl options:

  • You’ll use the “-b” option to pass cookie data (stored when you authenticated to NSX) back for authentication.
  • The “-X” option allows you to specify the HTTP method (in this case, POST).
  • The “-d” option lets us transfer JSON-encoded data to form the request for the object we are going to create. We’ll specify a filename here, preceded by the “@” symbol.
  • The “-H” option adds an appropriate “Content-Type: application/json” header to the request, since we are passing JSON-encoded data to the NSX controller.

When you put it all together, it looks something like this (substituting appropriate values where applicable):

curl --insecure -b cookies.txt -d @new-switch.json 
-H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST https://192.168.100.50/ws.v1/lswitch

As I mentioned earlier, you’re passing JSON-encoded data to the NSX controller; here are the contents of the new-switch.json file referenced in the above command example:

If you can’t see the code block, please click here.

Once again, I recommend piping the output of this command through python -m json.tool, as what you’ll get back on a successful call is some useful JSON data that includes, among other things, the UUID of the object (logical switch, in this case) that you just created. You can use this UUID in subsequent API calls to list properties, change properties, add logical switch ports, etc.

Clearly, there is much more that can be done with the OpenStack and VMware NSX APIs, but this at least should give you a starting point from which you can continue to explore in more detail. If anyone has any corrections, clarifications, or questions, please feel free to post them in the comments section below. All courteous comments (with vendor disclosure, where applicable) are welcome!

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In this article, I’ll show you how to install Ubuntu packages from a specific repository. It’s not that this is a terribly difficult process, but it also isn’t necessarily intuitive for those who haven’t had to do it before. I ran into this while trying to install an alpha release of LXC 1.0.0 for my recent post on automatically connecting LXC to Open vSwitch (OVS).

Normally, you’d install a package using apt-get like this:

apt-get install package-name

However, when you want to install a package from a specific repository, the command syntax shifts slightly so that it looks like this instead:

apt-get install package-name/repository

So, in my particular case, I was trying to install LXC. However, I needed the alpha LXC 1.0.0 package from the precise-backports repository. So the command to do that looked like this:

apt-get install lxc/precise-backports

Are there other useful apt-get tidbits like this that other readers might find particularly useful? Feel free to share in the comments below. Thanks for reading!

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Welcome to Technology Short Take #38, another installment in my irregularly-published series that collects links and thoughts on data center-related technologies from around the web. But enough with the introduction, let’s get on to the content already!

Networking

  • Jason Edelman does some experimenting with the Python APIs on a Cisco Nexus 3000. In the process, he muses about the value of configuration management tool chains such as Chef and Puppet in a world of “open switch” platforms such as Cumulus Linux.
  • Speaking of Cumulus Linux…did you see the announcement that Dell has signed a reseller agreement with Cumulus Networks? I’m pretty excited about this announcement, and I hope that Cumulus sees great success as a result. There are a variety of write-ups about the announcement; so good, many not so good. The not-so-good variety typically refers to Cumulus’ product as an SDN product when technically it isn’t. This article on Barron’s by Tiernan Ray is a pretty good summary of the announcement and some of its implications.
  • Pete Welcher has launched a series of articles discussing “practical SDN,” focusing on the key leaders in the market: NSX, DFA, and the yet-to-be-launched ACI. In the initial installation of the series, he does a good job of providing some basics around each of the products, although (as would be expected of a product that hasn’t launched yet) he has to do some guessing when it comes to ACI. The series continues with a discussion of L2 forwarding and L3 forwarding across the various products. Definitely worth reading, in my opinion.
  • Nick Buraglio takes away all your reasons for not collecting flow-based data from your environment with his write-up on installing nfsen and nfdump for NetFlow and/or sFlow collection.
  • Terry Slattery has a nice write-up on new network designs that are ideally suited for SDN. If you are looking for a primer on “next-generation” network designs, this is worth reviewing.
  • Need some Debian packages for Open vSwitch 2.0? Here’s another article from Nick Buraglio—he has some information to help you out.

Servers/Hardware

Nothing this time, but check back next time.

Security

Nothing from my end. Maybe you have something you’d like to share in the comments?

Cloud Computing/Cloud Management

  • Christian Elsen (who works in Integration Engineering at VMware) has a nice series of articles going on using OpenStack with vSphere and NSX. The series starts here, but follow the links at the bottom of that article for the rest of the posts. This is really good stuff—he includes the use of the NSX vSwitch with vSphere 5.5, and talks about vSphere OpenStack Virtual Appliance (VOVA) as well. All in all, well worth a read in my opinion.
  • Maish Saidel-Keesing (one of my co-authors on the first edition of VMware vSphere Design and also a super-sharp guy) recently wrote an article on how adoption of OpenStack will slow the adoption of SDN. While I agree that widespread adoption of OpenStack could potentially retard the evolution of enterprise IT, I’m not necessarily convinced that it will slow the adoption of SDN and network virtualization solutions. Why? Because, in part, I believe that the full benefits of something like OpenStack need a good network virtualization solution in order to be realized. Yes, some vendors are writing plugins for Neutron that manipulate physical switches. But for developers to get true isolation, application portability, the ability to re-create production environments in development—all that is going to require network virtualization.
  • Here’s a useful OpenStack CLI cheat sheet for some commonly-used commands.

Operating Systems/Applications

  • If you’re using Ansible (a product I haven’t had a chance to use but I’m closely watching), but I came across this article on an upcoming change to the SSH transport that Ansible uses. This change, referred to as “ssh_alt,” promises a significant performance increase for Ansible. Good stuff.
  • I don’t think I’ve mentioned this before, but Forbes Guthrie (my co-author on the VMware vSphere Design books and an already great guy) has a series going on using Linux as a domain controller for a vSphere-based lab. The series is up to four parts now: part 1, part 2, part 3, and part 4.
  • Need (or want) to increase the SCSI timeout for a KVM guest? See these instructions.
  • I’ve been recommending that IT pros get more familiar with Linux, as I think its influence in the data center will continue to grow. However, the problem that I sometimes face is that experienced folks tend to share these “super commands” that ordinary folks have a hard time decomposing. However, this site should make that easier. I’ve tried it—it’s actually pretty handy.

Storage

  • Jim Ruddy (an EMCer, former co-worker of mine, and an overall great guy) has a pretty cool series of articles discussing the use of EMC ViPR in conjunction with OpenStack. Want to use OpenStack Glance with EMC ViPR using ViPR’s Swift API support? See here. Want a multi-node Cinder setup with ViPR? Read how here. Multi-node Glance with ViPR? He’s got it. If you’re new to ViPR (who outside of EMC isn’t?), you might also find his articles on deploying EMC ViPR, setting up back-end storage for ViPR, or deploying object services with ViPR to also be helpful.
  • Speaking of ViPR, EMC has apparently decided to release it for free for non-commercial use. See here.
  • Looking for more information on VSAN? Look no further than Cormac Hogan’s extensive VSAN series (up to Part 14 at last check!). The best way to find this stuff is to check articles tagged VSAN on Cormac’s site. The official VMware vSphere blog also has a series of articles running; check out part 1 and part 2.

Virtualization

  • Did you happen to see this news about Microsoft Hyper-V Recovery Manager (HRM)? This is an Azure-hosted service that can be roughly compared to VMware’s Site Recovery Manager (SRM). However, unlike SRM (which is hosted on-premise), HRM is hosted by Microsoft Azure. As the article points out, it’s important to understand that this doesn’t mean your VMs are replicated to Azure—it’s just the orchestration portion of HRM that is running in Azure.
  • Oh, and speaking of Hyper-V…in early January Microsoft released version 3.5 of their Linux Integration Services, which primarily appears to be focused on adding Linux distribution support (CentOS/RHEL 6.5 is now supported).
  • Gregory Gee has a write-up on installing the Cisco CSR 1000V in VirtualBox. (I’m a recent VirtualBox convert myself; I find the vboxmanage command just so very handy.) Note that I haven’t tried this myself, as I don’t have a Cisco login to get the CSR 1000V code. If any readers have tried it, I’d love to hear your feedback. Gregory also has a few other interesting posts I’m planning to review in the next few weeks as well.
  • Sunny Dua, who works with VMware PSO in India, has a series of blog posts on architecting vSphere environments. It’s currently up to five parts; I don’t know how many more (if any) are planned. Here are the links: part 1 (clusters), part 2 (vCenter SSO), part 3 (storage), part 4 (design process), and part 5 (networking).

It’s time to wrap up now before this gets any longer. If you have any thoughts or tidbits you’d like to share, I welcome any and all courteous comments. Join (or start) the conversation!

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In this post, I’m going to show you a workaround to running Synergy on OS X Mavericks. If you visit the official Synergy page, you’ll note that the site indicates that full Mavericks support is still pending. However, if you’re willing to “get your hands dirty,” you can run Synergy on OS X Mavericks right now.

If you’re unfamiliar with Synergy, read this write-up (from 2 years ago) on how I use Synergy in my home office setup. The basic gist behind Synergy is that one computer will run the Synergy server; other computers will run the Synergy client and connect to the Synergy server. You’ll be able to use the keyboard and mouse attached to the Synergy server to control the Synergy clients.

Here’s how to get Synergy support running on OS X Mavericks now:

  1. Download the latest 10.8 Synergy build from the website. (I didn’t include a link here because the link changes as the version changes, so the link would become stale rather quickly.) This downloads as a .DMG file to your computer.
  2. Double-click the .DMG to open and mount it on your desktop. Inside the .DMG, you’ll see the Synergy app icon.
  3. Right-click (or Ctrl-click) on the Synergy app and select “Show Package Contents.”
  4. Double-click on Contents, then MacOS.
  5. In the MacOS file, copy the synergys and synergyc files to a different location. It doesn’t really matter where, just make note of the location.
  6. Close all the window and eject (unmount) the downloaded .DMG file.

For your Synergy server, you’ll need an appropriate configuration file. You can check my previously-mentioned Synergy post for an example configuration file, or you can peruse the official wiki. Either way, create an appropriate configuration file, and make note of its name and location.

When you’re ready, just launch the Synergy server from the OS X Terminal, like this (I’m assuming that synergys and its configuration file—creatively named synergy.conf—are stored in your home directory):

~/synergys -c ~/synergy.conf

Using whatever method you prefer, copy the previously-extracted synergyc file to your Synergy client(s). As before, it doesn’t really matter too much where you put the file, just make a note of the location. Then, using the OS X Terminal, run this (as before, I’m assuming synergyc is in your home directory):

~/synergyc <Name of Synergy server>

That’s it! You should now be able to use the keyboard and mouse on the Synergy server to control the Synergy client. I can verify that current builds of the Synergy client (synergyc) work just fine on OS X Mavericks, and I would imagine that the Synergy server would work fine as well (I just haven’t had time to test it). If anyone has tested it and would like to provide feedback in the comments, I’m sure other readers would appreciate it.

Enjoy! (By the way, if you do find Synergy to be useful, I’d recommend donating to the project.)

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I’ve been doing some experimenting with virtual Ethernet (veth) interfaces in Ubuntu as part of the ongoing work with network namespaces, LXC, and related technologies. A few times I’ve run into a very weird situation, and I have yet to figure out exactly what’s happening. I thought I might share it here in the hopes that someone else has seen this behavior and knows a) what causes it, and b) how to fix it.

I’ll start with a pretty vanilla installation of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Open vSwitch (OVS). When I run ip link list, I get output that looks something like this (click the image for a larger version):


Before adding the veth pair

OK, nothing unusual or unexpected there.

Next, I’ll add a pair of veth interfaces:

ip link add vmveth0 type veth peer vmveth1

Then the output of ip link list looks like this (I’ve circled some of the output to draw your attention; again, you can click for a larger version):


After adding the veth pair

See? The name of the veth peer interface gets garbled up and somehow corrupted. Because of this, nothing works—I can’t use the veth pair to connect network namespaces, or to connect a Linux bridge to OVS, or anything else. Rebooting the system does not fix the problem; only a rebuild seems to get rid of it.

Anyone have any ideas?

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