Scott's Weblog The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, networking, open source, and cloud computing

Multi-Container Docker with YAML and Vagrant

In this post, I’ll provide an example of using YAML to create a multi-container Docker environment in Vagrant. I made a brief mention of this technique in my earlier post talking about how to use Docker with Vagrant, but wanted to provide an example. For me, I know that examples are often quite helpful when I’m learning something new. Since one of my primary goals here is to help enable others to learn these technologies, I figured an example would be helpful. So, to that end, here’s an example that I hope will help others.

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Using Docker with Vagrant

As part of my ongoing effort to create tools to assist others in learning some of the new technologies out there, I spent a bit of time today working through the use of Docker with Vagrant. Neither of these technologies should be new to my readers; I’ve already provided quick introductory posts to both (see here and here). However, using these two together may provide a real benefit for users who are new to either technology, so I’d like to take a bit and show you how to use Docker with Vagrant.

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Technology Short Take #48

Welcome to Technology Short Take #48, another installation in my irregularly-published series that collects links, articles, and thoughts from around the web. This time around, the content is a bit heavier on cloud management and applications/operating systems, but still lots of good content all the way around (I hope, anyway).

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A Quick Introduction to Consul

For reasons that (hopefully) will become clear in the relatively near future, I decided I needed to take a look at Consul, a distributed service discovery tool and key value store. I know Consul’s description sounds like a mouthful of buzzwords, but it’s pretty accurate. This post provides a quick introduction to Consul, in which I’ll break down what Consul does and how it works (at a high level). I’ll then build on this introduction in later posts.

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Using Vagrant with CoreOS, etcd, fleet, and Docker

As a follow-up to my recent #vBrownBag session on “Docker and Friends,” I wanted to provide a quick and relatively easy way for VMware administrators to experiment with some of the technologies I demonstrated. Since not everyone has their own OpenStack cloud running in their basement, Vagrant seemed like a reasonable solution. So, in this post, I’ll show you how to use Vagrant to experiment with some of the technologies I demonstrated in the #vBrownBag session.

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First Git, now Vagrant

When I shared the story behind migrating the blog to Jekyll and GitHub, I mentioned that one of the reasons for the migration was to embrace Git as a part of my regular workflow. I’d been recommending to folks that they learn and use Git, and now I needed to “walk the walk” as well as “talk the talk.” This post describes another step in my effort to “walk the walk.”

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Thinking Out Loud: Does Docker on Windows Matter?

Nigel Poulton recently posted an article titled “ESXi vs. Hyper-V - Could Docker Support Be Significant,” in which he contemplates whether Microsoft’s announcement of Docker support on Windows will be a factor in the hypervisor battle between ESXi and Hyper-V. His post got me thinking—which is a good thing, I’d say—and I wanted to share my thoughts on the topic here.

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Why Comments Aren't Available Yet

A number of readers have asked—via e-mail, of course, given the subject of this post—why comments aren’t available yet on the new site. I’d like to take a quick moment to explain the current situation.

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Using the Fork-and-Branch Git Workflow

Now that I’ve provided you with an introduction to Git and a brief overview of using Git with GitHub, it’s time to build on that knowledge by taking a closer look at one workflow often used when collaborating with Git. The “fork and branch” workflow is a common way of collaborating on open source projects using Git and GitHub. In this post, I’m going to walk through this workflow (as I understand it—I’m constantly learning), with a focus toward helping those that are new to this sort of thing.

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Using Git with GitHub

Building on my earlier non-programmer’s introduction to Git, I wanted to talk a little bit about using Git with GitHub, a very popular service for hosting Git repositories. This post, in conjunction with the earlier introductory post on Git, will serve as the basis for a future post that talks about how to use Git and GitHub to collaborate with others on an open source project hosted on GitHub.

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