Scott's Weblog The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, networking, open source, and cloud computing

Editing Files from the Data ONTAP CLI

While setting up a Network Appliance storage system today for a customer, I ran into a situation that was a bit puzzling for a moment. I needed to change the IP address on the storage system’s clustered controllers, but in order to do that I needed to edit some files in the /etc directory on the root volume. Normally, that wouldn’t be a big deal; I’d just mount the root volume (vol0) via CIFS or NFS from my MacBook Pro and go from there.

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Linux-AD Integration, Version 4

This procedure allows Linux-based systems to authenticate against Active Directory. This configuration uses Kerberos for authentication, LDAP for account information, and Samba to help automate the process along the way. When this process is complete, AD users can be enabled for use on Linux systems on the network and login to those Linux systems using the same username and password as throughout the rest of Active Directory.

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Active Directory Integration Index

To help make it easier to find the various Active Directory integration articles I’ve written, I’m including links below to the latest version of each article. As new versions of an article are published, I can simply update this link to point to the new version.

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ESX Security Issues

Some security vulnerabilities in VMware ESX Server have been disclosed in the last few days. Secunia released this advisory on multiple vulnerabilities; the related vulnerabilities include flaws in the bundled versions of OpenSSH, OpenSSL, and Python that come with the service console (which, as you may already know, is a modified form of Red Hat Enterprise Linux).

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Apple iPhone

In case you’ve been hiding under a rock and haven’t yet heard (is that possible?), Apple today announced the iPhone:

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Pending Articles

With the holidays and all, a few articles that I’ve been working on for a while have been delayed. However, to assure you that more original content is on the way, here’s a quick look at some of the articles that I hope to have published here within the next couple of weeks:

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Bookmark Spam?

I’ve written before about del.icio.us, and how I find it extremely helpful in marking useful information I’ve found on the Internet. (Now we just need a way to keep those pages we’ve bookmarked because they were useful or helpful from suddenly disappearing and making our bookmarks invalid.) In the last few weeks, though, I’ve noticed something odd: bookmarks are being added to my Inbox (the “links for you” section, where other del.icio.us users can save a bookmark for you that they think might interest you) that don’t appear to be related in any way to links that I normally bookmark. Am I missing something, or is this the start of bookmark spam?

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Recovering Data Inside VMs Using NetApp Snapshots

Network Appliance Snapshots—point-in-time copies of a file system that can be created almost instantaneously and which generally require much smaller amounts of storage to keep—are an integral part of NetApp’s value over other storage systems. These snapshots make it far easier and quicker to recover from data loss or corruption than a tape backup system.

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Happy New Year!

I’d like to take this time and wish everyone a very Happy New Year! I hope that the Lord has blessed you this past year, and I hope that He will continue to bless you in the new year.

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Personal Computing as a Collection of VMs?

There appear to be basically two views on how virtualization will affect the future development of operating systems and computing environments in the personal computing space. One camp believes that virtualization functionality will be present within the operating system. Whether that virtualization functionality comes bundled with the operating system or is a third-party add-on to the operating system is, quite frankly, irrelevant to this particular discussion. The other camp believes that virtualization will be outside the operating system, perhaps in the form of a hypervisor or thin virtualization layer that resides “below” the OS and governs access to hardware. Again, the discussion of whether this virtualization layer comes bundled with the hardware or comes from a third-party vendor is an interesting discussion (and one that I’d like to have), but is not relevant right at this moment.

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