Scott's Weblog The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, networking, open source, and cloud computing

Call For Prayer

I know that my weblog defies the “normal rules” of how one should run a weblog in that I freely mix both personal and professional topics on the same site. As I said in my very first post, I can’t hide who I am, and I am a Christian. If that means that my Christianity bleeds into everything else, so be it.

(Read more...)

VMware Fusion Beta 3

The development team at VMware has released Beta 3 of VMware Fusion, and I had the opportunity to download and install the new version earlier this morning. Based on what I’ve seen so far, this is a solid improvement over earlier versions and the development team is making good progress on the product.

(Read more...)

ESX Security Vulnerabilities

Within the last few days, VMware has acknowledged the presence of a number of security vulnerabilities within the flagship ESX Server product. At least two of these vulnerabilities were discovered during an internal security audit of the code, but it’s unclear how many of the rest were internally discovered or externally discovered and reported to VMware. There has been no indication that there are any publicly-available exploits for any of these vulnerabilities.

(Read more...)

Open Source Virtualization Thoughts

Edward Aractingi started it all back on March 20 when he blogged about why VMware should open source ESX Server. Tarry Singh then weighed in on the matter from his weblog. Both men make very good points on the matter.

(Read more...)

New VMotion Boundary

In an earlier article about VMotion compatibility, I mentioned that SSE support was a VMotion boundary, i.e., a host with SSE3 CPUs and a host with SSE2 CPUs would not be able to VMotion guests between them without first masking the SSE support bit. I used this technique myself in our lab (more info in this article), and this issue drew some attention as the result of a presentation at VMworld last year.

(Read more...)

Using FPK in VDI Deployments

Many VMware Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) deployments will likely be environments where the virtual desktops will be the only desktops that the user ever logs into. Environments like outsourced development (developers use hosted desktops so that the source code never leaves the company’s equipment) and call centers are two examples that come to mind. A recent project in which I was involved, though, was a bit different: the customer wanted to use hosted desktops to provide access to a specific application (an application which was very data-intensive), but all other applications would be run from traditional “fat” PCs. Users would be logged in to both a traditional PC as well as a hosted desktop session, typically at the same time.

(Read more...)

VDI and Leostream Connection Broker

For those that aren’t familiar with this latest TLA (three-letter acronym), VDI stands for “Virtual Desktop Infrastructure” and it’s an alternate way of utilizing virtualization in the datacenter. Instead of virtualizing server instances, we virtualize desktop instances, and then provide a means for users to connect in to one of these available instances. (You can learn more at VMware’s Virtual Desktop Infrastructure web page.)

(Read more...)

SLED Integration into Active Directory

The information below comes from site reader Shannon VanWagner, who had the time to research this and come back with the information necessary to integrate SuSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) 10 into Active Directory (on Windows Server 2003 R2) using Kerberos, LDAP, and Samba. I haven’t tested these instructions (no copy of SLED with which to test), but I imagine that they should be fine. It’s really just the SLED-specific tweaks to the existing AD integration instructions, anyway.

(Read more...)

Various VMware Links

I think I’ve mentioned before that I use NetNewsWire for subscribing to various RSS and Atom feeds for various topics. Of course, given my interest in virtualization, VMware and VMware-related tags are things that are included in my feed list, and quite often I come across a link from a tag search or del.icio.us subscription that I find interesting. It may not justify a dedicated blog post about that particular item, though, because it may not be anything about which I can contribute useful information. After all, there’s enough useless junk floating around the Internet as it is; why should I contribute to the problem?

(Read more...)

VirtueDesktops to Cease Development

When I first started using virtual desktops with Mac OS X, I went through a couple of different iterations before settling on an application called Virtue (later to be renamed VirtueDesktops). Although it took some time to get used to the idea of not having a desktop pager window always present, the hotkey for popping up VirtueDesktops’ translucent pager became almost as ingrained in my fingers as the hotkey for Quicksilver (note I said “almost”).

(Read more...)