Scott's Weblog The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, networking, open source, and cloud computing

Linux-AD Integration with Windows Server 2008

In the event that your organization is considering a migration later this year (or next?) to Windows Server 2008 (formerly “Longhorn”), here are some instructions for integrating Linux login requests against Active Directory on Windows Server 2008. These instructions are based on Linux-AD Integration, Version 4 and utilize Kerberos, LDAP, and Samba.

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Samba and Windows Server 2008 Interoperability

Samba, as I’m sure you already know, is an open source implementation of SMB/CIFS for UNIX, Linux, and similar operating systems. I’ve found Samba to be extremely helpful in providing some assistance for integration into Active Directory, as evidenced by these articles:

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NIS on Windows Server 2008

Even though NIS is installed as part of the “Identity Management for UNIX” role service (part of the Active Directory Domain Services role) in Windows Server 2008, it appears that some additional steps are required in order to make it work as expected. If anyone has any additional information they’d like to share on this particular issue, please speak up in the comments.

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Mac Usenet Applications

I’m a multi-protocol kind of guy. What does that mean? Basically, it means that I use more than just a web browser. Typically, I have multiple Internet clients running at any given time—a browser (typically Camino, but sometimes Safari), an RSS reader (NetNewsWire), an IM client (Adium), Cocoalicious (for managing del.icio.us bookmarks), an IRC client (Colloquy), and an e-mail client. In each of these areas, there are high-quality applications available to choose from. For example, if I didn’t like Camino or Safari, I could always switch to Opera or Firefox; if I didn’t like NetNewsWire, I could switch to NewsFire, Shrook, or Vienna. I have options.

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Authenticating to Cisco IOS via Active Directory

The following configuration will enable you to authenticate login requests to Cisco equipment running IOS against Active Directory. This would, for example, allow you to centralize the authentication of your Cisco-based network infrastructure against Active Directory.

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ESX iSCSI Basic Configuration from the CLI

Sometimes, I find it better/faster/easier to perform tasks from the command-line interface (CLI) than going through a GUI. So, the other day, I needed to setup a new VMware ESX Server for iSCSI storage, and thought I’d document the commands I used to set that up.

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NFS Help

I like to think that I’m a fairly intelligent guy, able to pick up most things reasonably quickly given the opportunity. After all, I transitioned from a Windows-only SE into an SE with a good reputation for VMware ESX Server, various Linux flavors, Mac OS X, and some Cisco configuration (hey, if you can do GRE tunnels with IPSec encryption, you’re not too shabby with IOS). But I’m having a real problem with NFS.

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Statistically Secure

I’ll start out by saying that I am neither a security expert nor a statistician. With that disclaimer in hand, I wanted to briefly share my thoughts on the “days of risk” assessment that has recently been used to compare the security of Windows, Linux (Red Hat and SuSE), Mac OS X, and Sun Solaris. Before continuing, I encourage you to have a look at the actual report itself, along with a few related articles:

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Optimizing iSCSI Traffic with ESX

A response in this VMTN forums thread by Paul Lalonde got me to thinking about iSCSI traffic, network designs, and the software initiator provided with ESX Server. The statement was this (in response to questions about how ESX uses network links to communicate with an iSCSI storage array):

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Giving iTerm a Try

It invariably occurs that, regardless of whether I’m on a computer running Microsoft Windows Server 2003, some flavor of Linux or UNIX, or Mac OS X, I open a command prompt at some point or another during my session. I can’t really explain why; it’s just how I work. I find it faster to type ipconfig /all to get the networking configuration on a Windows box than right-clicking on My Network Places, selecting Properties, right-clicking the network connection, selecting Properties—you get the idea. I suppose it dates from my MS-DOS days, where I didn’t really have any other choice but to use the command line.

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