Scott's Weblog The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, networking, open source, and cloud computing

MKS Client Updated

In the short period of time since I mentioned the Virtual Machine MKS Client in my post on assorted VMware tools, the client has gone from version 1.1 to version 1.8 and has added tons of functionality. Some of the features include:

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Cisco Switches on VMware

I just saw this headline from virtualization.info about Cisco being the first to announce a third-party virtual switch for ESX Server. Honestly, I’m not too terribly surprised.

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Indestructible

How many of us would like to be indestructible? To know that no matter what happens, no matter what comes against us, we cannot be destroyed or killed? It would be pretty cool, right?

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Live Migration vs. Quick Migration

So there’s been a flurry of coverage over the last couple of weeks regarding a statement from Microsoft regarding WSV’s lack of live migration (aka VMotion) functionality. As I mentioned when I discussed the announcement of features being cut from Windows Server Virtualization (WSV, or “Viridian”), the lack of live migration functionality really is, in my opinion, a serious stumbling block for Microsoft. I wasn’t the only one that thought so, either. (There was a post about it on the VMTN Blog at some point as well, but I can’t find a link for it now.)

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Delayed Replication DCs and Authoritative Restores

The idea behind an Active Directory “delayed replication DC” (also referred to as a “slow DC” or a “lag DC”) is that organizations can more quickly recover portions of their Active Directory structure by performing an authoritative restore from this delayed replication DC instead of having to go back to tape. Keep in mind that many organizations use off-site storage of backup tapes, and recalling backup tapes from the off-site storage facility can take some time, as can the tape operations themselves. Let’s face it: when it comes to speed, tape isn’t exactly king of the hill.

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Killing Ads in RSS Feeds in NetNewsWire

I don’t like advertisements in my RSS feeds. I just don’t. It’s not that I begrudge the authors the ability to monetize their content; that’s their choice, and I can certainly understand the need to pay for hosting and bandwidth costs. The day might even come one day when I am faced with the same issues here on this site. Even so, I don’t like ads in the feeds. After all, if it’s a good site, I am very likely to visit the site anyway, even with full feeds, so that I can comment, view others’ comments, or see related posts.

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Assorted VMware Tools

Over the past few weeks, a number of VMware-related tools have been released. All of these tools are third-party tools written by avid VMware fans or ISVs, and as far as I am aware all of these tools are available at no cost.

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Hanging Around #vmware

I’m not really sure why, but for some reason I got on a kick to start using IRC. So, for the last week or so, I’ve been regularly logging in to irc.freenode.net using Colloquy (a really great Mac OS X IRC client, by the way) and hanging around in the #vmware channel, helping people with their VMware-related problems and questions—and learning a little bit in the process.

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ESX Server-AD Integration

Although much of the administration of servers running VMware ESX Server 3.0 will occur in the Windows-based Virtual Infrastructure client connected to a VirtualCenter server, there are times when it is quicker or easier to perform an administrative task directly on the ESX Server itself—either via the command-line interface (CLI) or via the VI client authenticating directly against the ESX Server. The problem with this is that, by default, administrators will have to use different credentials when connecting the VI client to ESX Server directly. In addition, these credentials must be managed separately from Active Directory, and separately on each individual ESX Server. As the number of ESX Servers in a farm grows, this can quickly become an administrative nightmare.

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UAC and ktpass.exe

User Account Control (UAC) is a feature new to Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 that is designed to help protect Windows-based systems against processes running with administrative permissions. It’s a great idea, but the implementation is, in my humble opinion, a bit flawed.

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