Scott's Weblog The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, networking, open source, and cloud computing

Fusion Released

I just finished downloading the final release version of VMware Fusion from the VMware web site, and as I type this blog posting I’m in the process of updating the VMware Tools in my Windows XP Professional VM. Already in my limited testing of the new release I see improvements in Unity (the Windows background no longer shows up when you minimize a window). As I’m a bit limited on time right at the moment (in the midst of a VMware deployment, imagine that!), I’ll stop there, and I’ll post more thoughts about the final version later today.

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Fusion Ship Date Announced

As is being reported throughout the Internet, VMware has announced that their VMware Fusion product, which provides virtualization functionality for Intel-based Macs, will ship on August 6. I won’t repeat the long list of features that Fusion provides (other sites have covered that very well), but I will state that I have been using Fusion since the very beginning (before the public beta, there was a “Friends and Family” release). I met some of the developers last year at VMworld 2006, and they have done an awesome job with this product. Regis, Ben, and the rest of the team: Fantastic work! Now on to Fusion 2.0!

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Heading to VMworld 2007!

I just got the news today that I’m heading to VMworld 2007 in September! It’s going to be a fantastic trip—I haven’t been to San Francisco in years, and I’m looking forward to VMworld, the keynotes, the announcements, and the in-depth technical sessions. Drop me a line and let me know if you’re going, and perhaps I’ll see you there!

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Learning Solaris

I’ve targeted Solaris (specifically, Solaris 10 on x86) as the next major technology that I’m going to try to learn. I’ve always been fascinated with UNIX and UNIX-like operating systems such as Linux, and Linux’s popularity on the x86 platform made it much easier to learn because I didn’t have to acquire any exotic hardware. With Sun’s (apparent) renewed interest in x86/x64, Solaris is much more accessible now than it was in the past.

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MKS Client Updated

In the short period of time since I mentioned the Virtual Machine MKS Client in my post on assorted VMware tools, the client has gone from version 1.1 to version 1.8 and has added tons of functionality. Some of the features include:

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Cisco Switches on VMware

I just saw this headline from virtualization.info about Cisco being the first to announce a third-party virtual switch for ESX Server. Honestly, I’m not too terribly surprised.

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Indestructible

How many of us would like to be indestructible? To know that no matter what happens, no matter what comes against us, we cannot be destroyed or killed? It would be pretty cool, right?

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Live Migration vs. Quick Migration

So there’s been a flurry of coverage over the last couple of weeks regarding a statement from Microsoft regarding WSV’s lack of live migration (aka VMotion) functionality. As I mentioned when I discussed the announcement of features being cut from Windows Server Virtualization (WSV, or “Viridian”), the lack of live migration functionality really is, in my opinion, a serious stumbling block for Microsoft. I wasn’t the only one that thought so, either. (There was a post about it on the VMTN Blog at some point as well, but I can’t find a link for it now.)

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Delayed Replication DCs and Authoritative Restores

The idea behind an Active Directory “delayed replication DC” (also referred to as a “slow DC” or a “lag DC”) is that organizations can more quickly recover portions of their Active Directory structure by performing an authoritative restore from this delayed replication DC instead of having to go back to tape. Keep in mind that many organizations use off-site storage of backup tapes, and recalling backup tapes from the off-site storage facility can take some time, as can the tape operations themselves. Let’s face it: when it comes to speed, tape isn’t exactly king of the hill.

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Killing Ads in RSS Feeds in NetNewsWire

I don’t like advertisements in my RSS feeds. I just don’t. It’s not that I begrudge the authors the ability to monetize their content; that’s their choice, and I can certainly understand the need to pay for hosting and bandwidth costs. The day might even come one day when I am faced with the same issues here on this site. Even so, I don’t like ads in the feeds. After all, if it’s a good site, I am very likely to visit the site anyway, even with full feeds, so that I can comment, view others’ comments, or see related posts.

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