Running Synergy on OS X Mavericks

In this post, I’m going to show you a workaround to running Synergy on OS X Mavericks. If you visit the official Synergy page, you’ll note that the site indicates that full Mavericks support is still pending. However, if you’re willing to “get your hands dirty,” you can run Synergy on OS X Mavericks right now.

If you’re unfamiliar with Synergy, read this write-up (from 2 years ago) on how I use Synergy in my home office setup. The basic gist behind Synergy is that one computer will run the Synergy server; other computers will run the Synergy client and connect to the Synergy server. You’ll be able to use the keyboard and mouse attached to the Synergy server to control the Synergy clients.

Here’s how to get Synergy support running on OS X Mavericks now:

  1. Download the latest 10.8 Synergy build from the website. (I didn’t include a link here because the link changes as the version changes, so the link would become stale rather quickly.) This downloads as a .DMG file to your computer.
  2. Double-click the .DMG to open and mount it on your desktop. Inside the .DMG, you’ll see the Synergy app icon.
  3. Right-click (or Ctrl-click) on the Synergy app and select “Show Package Contents.”
  4. Double-click on Contents, then MacOS.
  5. In the MacOS file, copy the synergys and synergyc files to a different location. It doesn’t really matter where, just make note of the location.
  6. Close all the window and eject (unmount) the downloaded .DMG file.

For your Synergy server, you’ll need an appropriate configuration file. You can check my previously-mentioned Synergy post for an example configuration file, or you can peruse the official wiki. Either way, create an appropriate configuration file, and make note of its name and location.

When you’re ready, just launch the Synergy server from the OS X Terminal, like this (I’m assuming that synergys and its configuration file—creatively named synergy.conf—are stored in your home directory):

~/synergys -c ~/synergy.conf

Using whatever method you prefer, copy the previously-extracted synergyc file to your Synergy client(s). As before, it doesn’t really matter too much where you put the file, just make a note of the location. Then, using the OS X Terminal, run this (as before, I’m assuming synergyc is in your home directory):

~/synergyc <Name of Synergy server>

That’s it! You should now be able to use the keyboard and mouse on the Synergy server to control the Synergy client. I can verify that current builds of the Synergy client (synergyc) work just fine on OS X Mavericks, and I would imagine that the Synergy server would work fine as well (I just haven’t had time to test it). If anyone has tested it and would like to provide feedback in the comments, I’m sure other readers would appreciate it.

Enjoy! (By the way, if you do find Synergy to be useful, I’d recommend donating to the project.)

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  1. Timo Sugliani’s avatar

    Hi Scott,

    I do use Synergy since a very long time (a lot of years now) and it’s a tool that completely change the way I did setup my office.

    Basically I run the server on my every day laptop, and whenever I plug into my home office or work office, I usually have another “Desktop” which most of the time has a beautiful dual screen setup (2×27″ with very high resolution and gives amazing workspace and comfort to work with)

    Those desktops are configured with the synergy client, and connect automatically to my laptop server (the client always continue to poll for the server), so whenever I’m plugged into that network, I can continue to use my Laptop keyboard/Mouse without bothering of moving things around (keyboard, mouse, laptops) on my desk – Simple & efficient ! (Probably 6+ year setup like this and can’t go back anymore)

    Hope this gives you some insight on how it can be used.

  2. slowe’s avatar

    Timo, my setup is similar to yours, except that I use an app called ControlPlane to automatically start the Synergy client when it detects I’m in my home office. Otherwise, my setup sounds similar to yours. Thanks for your comment!

  3. Curious Dude’s avatar

    Does this bypass the security though?